News

How to Wean Your Milkaholic Baby

Most babies take to solids like a duck to water. But some babies are so hooked on milk that they refused solids point-blank, making weaning resembles a full on battle. For milkaholic babies, eating with spoon is totally intolerable. They will leave you in no doubt what you can do with your spoon, and that definitely doesn’t include putting the spoon in their mouth.

If your baby happens to be a milkaholic, you need to approach weaning gently. Force, coercion and bribery will not work, and you and your baby will simply end up miserable. And your mealtime will have more drama than a cheap soap opera.

Your baby may be little, but when it comes to eating, he knows what he wants.  But not all is lost. You need patience and strategy. But first, if your baby is less than six months old and is still thriving on milk, don’t make a big issue of it. Leave weaning until he is six months, the age health professionals recommend to start weaning. There is no point going into battle when it is not necessary.

Give your baby time to adjust

Start by cutting your baby’s milk intake by a third, giving him non-milk fluids as replacement. At feeding time, before offering him milk, try giving him a tiny amount of solid food. If he refuses, don’t push. However, don’t give up either. Try pattern for a week. If this doesn’t work, further reduce the milk by half. Follow the same process. When babies are hungry, they will eat. So, when your baby shows any sign of hunger, offer solids first.

If your baby dislikes eating with the spoon, try giving him foods he can eat with his hands. At mealtimes, sit your baby at the table with you, and let him play with his food. It is natural for babies explore objects with their mouth. By allowing him to explore the food without pressure, you are giving him a chance to associate food with positive feelings, rather than misery.

Allowing your baby to play with food seems contrary to good table manners, but during weaning, your main goal is to let your baby enjoy food, not good manners. You will have time to teach your baby good table manners when he has mastered eating.

Check for other potential problem

Your baby’s refusal to eat solids may not be due to sheer stubbornness, so check for other potential problem. Does he have difficulty swallowing or chewing? If that’s the case, speak to your GP.

 


Good Nutrition for Babies

Good nutrition is a family concern. If you want healthy babies who will grow as healthy children and adults, you as parents have to create a healthy lifestyle and lead by example. Children are products of their parents, who they are is largely down to their upbringing. Good nutrition doesn’t have to come at a high price. So, bad nutrition can’t be blamed on the economy, the rising cost of living or the lack of time
What is good nutrition?
Good nutrition means a proper balance of fats, carbohydrates, proteins, vitamins and minerals. Of course it is best to get these nutrients from varied sources, but not necessary. Once food reached the stomach, they all get mixed up and the body doesn’t care whether the source of protein came from chicken or beefsteak, or the carbohydrates came from organic brown rice or your local supermarket’s value porridge oats.
Good nutrition for babies
Babies from 0-4 months get their nutrients from their milk. Formula milk are specifically prepared to contain the nutrients that babies need, while nutrients on breastmilk came from the mother’s diet and her body reserves. If the mother’s diet is deficient, it is likely to affect the quality of her milk, so it is important that mothers have a balanced diet. Of course, this is not a reason to choose to use formula milk. After all, it is easier, safer and cheaper to provide mothers good nutrition than opting for formula milk.
Main goals for improving nutrition:
Babies, children and adults all have the same basic goals for improving nutrition. They are:
1. Increase level of complex carbohydrates
2. Reduce intake of foods high in sugar and refined foods
3. Reduce salt intake
4. Reduce intake of fats for children over two years old and adults
To increase the level of your complex carbohydrates, opt for unrefined energy food like brown bread, brown rice, pasta, potatoes, and oats. Some fruits and vegetables like spinach, artichokes, courgette, Brussels sprout, broccoli and beans are also rich in complex carbohydrates.
White rice and bread from refined flour are not very good source of complex carbohydrates as the refining process strips them of their Vitamin B, fibre and other minerals content.
Proteins on the other hand can be found in meat, fish, eggs, dairy products, tofu, nuts and seeds. Meat and fish proteins are easily absorbed in the body.  Nuts and seeds rich in proteins are almonds, pistachios, peanuts, pine nuts, pecan, Sunflower seeds, sesame seeds, and flax seeds.
Vitamins and minerals are more abundant in fruits and vegetables.

Are Clever Children Product of Nature or Nurture?

Judging by the subtle and not too subtle parental competition in many baby and toddler groups I have the misfortune to attend; and the number of products in the market promising to turn our babies into little Einstiens, many of us want to have clever children. And that is perfectly normal. After all, as parents we should be our children’s number one fan.

So, the question is – what makes children clever? Is it something that parents can influence during the children’s infant years? Are children born clever or are they product of their parents’ nurturing? The answer is ‘both.’ Geniuses are not made by parents who cram their children with academic knowledge. They were already born gifted, and are nurtured to their full potential by their parents.

Parents can help their children developed but they can’t perform miracles. For example, a child with poor coordination may be trained to play football, but will never make it to the premier league. (Otherwise, all the boys who spent all their free time and weekends training would have all been signed up by premiership clubs.) A coach may be able to teach a child with a poor eye for the ball to play tennis, but that child will never become a Wimbledon champion. A child with zero interest in Physics can be taught it but will never be another Einstein. Of course, this doesn’t mean that parents should accept that their child is average. And it’s definitely not a reason for children not to try to improve on what they are born with.

However, the focus on the baby’s development should not be on cleverness but on developing the baby’s existing potential. Each child is born with potential, but they vary. Many children may not have the making of the next Roger Federer, Michael Schumacher or Adele, but they all have the potential for love, patience, hard work, problem-solving and effective communication, skills that are important and necessary in their adult life.

Pushing babies and children to reach beyond their capabilities will simply lead to frustrations and misery. It is far easier and more productive to work with what they already have. The world only needs one tennis player to occupy a number one slot at a time, but it needs people to manage other people, to run businesses, to teach, to nurse, to keep machines going. These tasks don’t need geniuses, they need people who have the ability and willingness to learn and work. They need people who have the skills to get along with others, people who are willing to work beneath their own perceived abilities to get the work done.

Likewise, if a baby is born clever, restricting his ability will end up in the same frustrations and misery. Making children conform to the norm, when he is above that, is a recipe for failure and bad behaviour.

 


Nutrients Vital to Your Babies Growth

He may not be six months old yet, but you just know that your baby is ready for solid foods. Milk isn’t enough to keep him through the night, when it was fine a few weeks ago. He can definitely sit on his own, and he can’t take his eyes off your spoon when you’re eating, he makes you feel guilty for not sharing. In fact, once in a while in a while, he gets feed up with you, he tries to reach the food himself, so he can have a taste too. Yes, he is definitely ready. And despite recommendation, you are not putting off solids until he is six months old.

So, off you checked for what you need. Baby spoon and bowl – checked. Bibs to catch most of the food that dribbles out of his mouth – checked. Paper bib for emergency – checked. Funky bandana bib for best – checked. Food processor – checked. Little Tupperware for storing baby food in batches – checked.

Now, the only question left, and the most important of all – what should you feed your baby? What are the essential nutrients that babies need in their diet?

Iron – You may have noticed that many formula milk and baby foods are fortified with iron. That’s because, apart from its important role in the making of red blood cells that carries oxygen throughout the body, iron helps in the development of your baby’s brain. Iron deficiency in babies can affect the development of their spatial skills, a part of the memory that stores information related to their environment, and is vital for getting around spaces and places. According to a research published in the American Society for Clinical Nutrition, the concentration of iron in breastmilk decreases during weaning. So, it is important that you give your baby foods that are good source of iron.

Zinc – Like iron, zinc is another type of metal that is vital to the human body. It is an important micronutrient for breaking down and absorbing protein. It is also vital for cell growth and differentiation, a process in which less specialised cells changed into specialised cells. It is also important to the function of the immune system. If your baby has low zinc level, he is at risk of gastrointestinal infections and his immune system is weakened.

Calcium – As we all know, Calcium is the foundation of healthy bones and teeth. Your baby’s body uses this element to build strong bones. If your baby has low calcium level he is at risk of developing Rickets, a disease characterised by softening of the bone that results to bowed legs, stunted growth, and in severe cases, muscle pain and weakness.

Vitamin D – This Vitamin is important for Calcium absorption. If your baby lacks Vitamin D, he will not be able to properly absorb the Calcium from the food he eats. Our body produces enough Vitamin D with the help of sunlight. So, in the summer, taking your baby for a walk in the morning when the sun is not too strong will do the trick. However, in winter, there is not enough sun to help the body produce Vitamin D. Although, ensuring that your baby gets enough vitamin D isn’t a major problem as long as your baby still takes formula milk with his meals, as formulas are fortified with Vitamin D.

Other essential nutrients your baby needs are Vitamins A, Nutrients Vital to Your Babies Growth

He may not be six months old yet, but you just know that your baby is ready for solid foods. Milk isn’t enough to keep him through the night, when it was fine a few weeks ago. He can definitely sit on his own, and he can’t take his eyes off your spoon when you’re eating, he makes you feel guilty for not sharing. In fact, once in a while in a while, he gets feed up with you, he tries to reach the food himself, so he can have a taste too. Yes, he is definitely ready. And despite recommendation, you are not putting off solids until he is six months old.

So, off you checked for what you need. Baby spoon and bowl – checked. Bibs to catch most of the food that dribbles out of his mouth – checked. Paper bib for emergency – checked. Funky bandana bib for best – checked. Food processor – checked. Little Tupperware for storing baby food in batches – checked.

Now, the only question left, and the most important of all – what should you feed your baby? What are the essential nutrients that babies need in their diet?

Iron – You may have noticed that many formula milk and baby foods are fortified with iron. That’s because, apart from its important role in the making of red blood cells that carries oxygen throughout the body, iron helps in the development of your baby’s brain. Iron deficiency in babies can affect the development of their spatial skills, a part of the memory that stores information related to their environment, and is vital for getting around spaces and places. According to a research published in the American Society for Clinical Nutrition, the concentration of iron in breastmilk decreases during weaning. So, it is important that you give your baby foods that are good source of iron.

Zinc – Like iron, zinc is another type of metal that is vital to the human body. It is an important micronutrient for breaking down and absorbing protein. It is also vital for cell growth and differentiation, a process in which less specialised cells changed into specialised cells. It is also important to the function of the immune system. If your baby has low zinc level, he is at risk of gastrointestinal infections and his immune system is weakened.

Calcium – As we all know, Calcium is the foundation of healthy bones and teeth. Your baby’s body uses this element to build strong bones. If your baby has low calcium level he is at risk of developing Rickets, a disease characterised by softening of the bone that results to bowed legs, stunted growth, and in severe cases, muscle pain and weakness.

Vitamin D – This Vitamin is important for Calcium absorption. If your baby lacks Vitamin D, he will not be able to properly absorb the Calcium from the food he eats. Our body produces enough Vitamin D with the help of sunlight. So, in the summer, taking your baby for a walk in the morning when the sun is not too strong will do the trick. However, in winter, there is not enough sun to help the body produce Vitamin D. Although, ensuring that your baby gets enough vitamin D isn’t a major problem as long as your baby still takes formula milk with his meals, as formulas are fortified with Vitamin D.

Other essential nutrients your baby needs are Vitamins A, B, C and E.B, C and E.

How to Help Your Child Cope with Homework Stress

Whether you see homework as a reassuring sign that your child’s school is taking the children’s academic progress seriously, or simply an added burden that you and your child don’t need, homework is here to stay for the present. And is the bane of the modern families’ busy lives.

Even a happy child, who loves school, once in a while succumbs to the pressure of homework and ends up giving in to tantrums and tears. And very few parents can say hand on heart that they didn’t have arguments with their children and had doors slammed on them over homework.

In a poll posted on debate.org, participants are asked whether children should have homework and a staggering 79% who answered the question favoured the scrapping of homework. Perhaps the result is not surprising as the increasing amount of homework children take home from school is causing stress in children even as young as six years old.

Of course, not all children find doing their homework such an ordeal. But if you are concerned about your child, here some things you can to do help ease homework burden.

Watch out for signs of stress.

To see signs of stress in young children, you may need to pay closer attention to their behaviour. Reluctance to go to school, headache and stomach-ache complaints can be signs that your child is unhappy at school.

Help your children manage their time.

You may think your child is too young to learn organisational and time-management skills, but these are two vital skills they need to help them avoid homework stress. For instance, instead of doing their homework the day before they need to hand it in, get your child to do 10 minutes everyday. This way, he will not be cramming at the last minute, and he doesn’t feel that he is giving up a large chunk of his free time to homework.

Remove distractions while your child is doing his homework. Turn the telly off, or designate a quiet place for studying, preferably away from computer and video games.

Limit your children’s extra-curricular activities. It is not uncommon for KS1 children to be doing different after school activities, from dancing to martial arts classes, Mondays to Fridays. Curricular activities can do your children a lot of good, but if they have to be somewhere every day after school, they will have no time to complete their homework during the week. And they’ll end up spending their weekend doing their homework, or cramming on Monday morning.

Finally, encourage early bedtime.

Sleep deprivation can cause serious problems in children and increases their stress level. Research finds that bad behaviour in children is related to lack of sleep. Children need at least 9 ½ hours’ sleep.